Corporate Governance

CNH Industrial is a company, organized under the laws of the Netherlands, which is the entity resulting from a business combination with Fiat Industrial S.p.A. and CNH Global N.V. consummated on September 29, 2013 (the ‘Merger”). CNH Industrial qualifies as a foreign private issuer under the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) listing standards and its common shares are listed on the NYSE and on the Mercato Telematico Azionario managed by Borsa Italiana S.p.A. (“MTA”).

In accordance with the NYSE Listed Company Manual, CNH Industrial is permitted to follow home country practice with regard to certain corporate governance standards. CNH Industrial has adopted, except as discussed below, the best practice provisions of the Dutch corporate governance code issued by the Dutch Corporate Governance Code Committee, which entered into force on January 1, 2009 (the “Dutch Corporate Governance Code”) and contains principles and best practice provisions that regulate relations between the board of directors of a company and its Shareholders.

In this report CNH Industrial addresses its overall corporate governance structure. The Company discloses, and intends to disclose any material departure from the best practice provisions of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code in its future annual reports.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Pursuant to CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association, the Board of Directors may have three or more members. At the general meeting of the Shareholders held on September 9, 2013, the number of the members of the Board of Directors was set at eleven and the current slate of Directors was elected. The term of office of the current Board of Directors will expire on April 16, 2014 and the first CNH Industrial annual general meeting of Shareholders will elect a new Board for a one-year term. Each Director may be reappointed at any subsequent general meeting of Shareholders.

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The Board as a whole is responsible for the strategy of the Company. The Board of Directors is composed of two executive Directors (i.e., the Chairman of the Company and the Chief Executive Officer), having responsibility for the day-to-day management of the Company, and nine non-executive Directors, who do not have such day-to-day responsibility within CNH Industrial or the Group. Under Article 16 of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association, the general authority to represent CNH Industrial shall be vested in the Board of Directors, as well as in each of the executive Directors to whom the title Chairman of the Company or Chief Executive Officer has been granted.

On September 9, 2013 the Board of Directors of the Company appointed – with effects of the closing of the Merger – the following internal committees: (i) an Audit Committee, (ii) a Governance and Sustainability Committee, and (iii) a Compensation Committee.

On certain key industrial matters the Board of Directors is advised by the Group Executive Council (“GEC”): the GEC is an operational decision-making body of the CNH Industrial Group, which is responsible for reviewing the operating performance of the businesses, and making decisions on certain operational matters.

Seven directors qualified as independent (representing a majority) for purposes of NYSE rules, Rule 10A-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and the Dutch Corporate Governance Code.

The Board of Directors has also appointed Mr. John Elkann Senior Non-Executive Director for the purpose of Section III.8.1 of the Code.

The Board of Directors has also appointed certain officers of the Company, including the Chief Financial Officer, the Chief Human Resources Officer, the Chief Purchasing Officer, the Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer, the Treasurer, and the Secretary of the Board.

Since September 30, 2013 - after the effectiveness of the merger transaction – to the year-end there was one meeting of the Board of Directors. Attendance at that meeting was 91%.

The current composition of the Board of Directors is the following:

  • Sergio Marchionne Chairman (Executive-Director)
    Sergio Marchionne is Chairman of CNH Industrial N.V. He was Chairman of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. and CNH Global N.V. until the integration of these companies into CNH Industrial. He also serves as CEO of Fiat S.p.A. and Chairman and CEO of Chrysler Group LLC.
    He holds a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy from the University of Toronto and a Bachelor of Laws from Osgoode Hall Law School at York University in Toronto, as well as a Master of Business Administration and a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Windsor (Canada). Mr. Marchionne is a barrister, solicitor and chartered accountant.
    He began his professional career in Canada. From 1983 to 1985, he worked for Deloitte & Touche. From 1985 to 1988, at the Lawson Mardon Group of Toronto. From 1989 to 1990, he served as Executive Vice President of Glenex Industries. From 1990 to 1992, he was Chief Financial Officer (CFO) at Acklands Ltd. From 1992 to 1994, also in Toronto, he held the position of Vice President of Legal and Corporate Development and CFO of the Lawson Group. From 1994 to 2000, he covered various positions of increasing responsibility at Algroup, headquartered in Zurich (Switzerland), until becoming its CEO. He then went on to head the Lonza Group Ltd first as CEO (2000-2001) and then as Chairman (2002). In February 2002, he became CEO of the SGS Group of Geneva. In March 2006, he was appointed Chairman of the Company, a position which he continues to hold. He was non-executive Vice Chairman and Senior Independent Director of UBS from 2008 until April 2010. Mr. Marchionne has been a member of the Board of Fiat S.p.A. since May 2003 and was appointed CEO in June 2004. He became CEO of Chrysler Group LLC in June 2009, as well as Chairman in September 2011. In May 2010, he joined the Board of Directors of Exor S.p.A. He is a member of the Board of Philip Morris International Inc. and of the Board of the Peterson Institute for International Economics as well as Chairman of the Italian Branch of the Council for the United States and Italy.
    Born in 1952, Canadian and Italian citizenship.
  • Richard Tobin Chief Executive Officer (Executive-Director), Chief Operating Officer for the NAFTA Region
    Prior to the integration of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. and CNH Global N.V. into CNH Industrial, Mr. Tobin was Group Chief Operating Officer of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. and President and Chief Executive Officer of CNH, a role he assumed in January 2012 after two years as Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for CNH.
    Mr. Tobin carries forth extensive experience in international finance and management that he acquired through regional and global leadership positions of growing responsibility and scope. He began his career with GTE Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut (U.S.), as Vice President of International Marketing. In 1995, he joined Alusuisse-Lonza SA in Zurich, Switzerland, as General Manager and Vice President, where he remained until 2001, the year when he joined Alcan Aluminum of Montreal, Canada, with a general management role. In 2002, Mr. Tobin joined SGS Group of Geneva, Switzerland, where he became the Chief Operating Officer for North America. In 2004, he became SGS Group’s Chief Finance Officer & Head of Information Technology, a position he retained for six years before finally joining CNH in March 2010. Mr. Tobin holds Bachelor of Arts and Master of Business Administration degrees from Norwich University and Drexel University, respectively. He currently sits on the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors and is a member of the Business Roundtable.
    Born in 1963, American citizenship.
  • John  Elkann  Director (Senior  Non-Executive  Director),  Chairman  of  the  Governance  and  Sustainability Committee, Chairman of the Compensation Committee
    John Elkann was a Director of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. from incorporation of the company until its integration into CNH Industrial. Born in New York in 1976, Mr. Elkann holds a degree in Management Engineering from Politecnico di Torino. He was appointed Chairman of Fiat S.p.A. in April 2010, where he had served as Vice Chairman since 2004 and Board member since December 1997. Mr. Elkann is also Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of EXOR S.p.A. and Chairman of Giovanni Agnelli e C. S.a.p.az.. In addition, he serves as Chairman of Editrice La Stampa and is also on the boards of The Economist Group, News Corporation and Banca Leonardo. While at university, he gained experience at various Fiat Group companies in the UK and Poland (manufacturing), as well as France (sales and marketing). The formal start to his career was in 2001, when he joined General Electric as a member of Group Audit, with assignments in Asia, the USA and Europe. Mr. Elkann is member of the IAC of Brookings Institution and of MoMA. He also serves as Vice Chairman of the Italian Aspen Institute and the Giovanni Agnelli Foundation.
    Born in 1976, Italian citizenship.
  • Mina Gerowin Director (Non-Executive Director), Member of the Governance and Sustainability Committee
    Born in New York, Ms. Gerowin has an A.B. from Smith College in Political Economy, a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School where she was a Baker Scholar. She practised law in Switzerland and New York then worked as Investment Banker in International Mergers and Acquisitions at Lazard Frères in New York and Paris. Ms. Gerowin formed her own consulting and investing company, completing five LBO transactions and participated in their direction as an officer and director. After their sale she consulted internationally. Ms. Gerowin was a Managing Director and partner of Paulson Europe LLP in London working on event, credit, distressed, recovery and merger arbitrage. She joined Paulson & Co. in 2004, helping establish the hedge fund's Event fund. Mina Gerowin is also Director of Exor S.p.A.
    Born in 1951, American citizenship.
  • Maria  Patrizia  Grieco  Director  (Non-Executive  Director  -  independent),  Member  of  the  Compensation Committee
    Maria Patrizia Grieco was a Director of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. from April 5, 2012 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial.
    Maria Patrizia Grieco was born in Milan and holds a degree in Law from the Milan State University. She began her carrier in 1977 at the Italtel Legal & General Affairs division, becoming Head of the division in 1994. In 1999 she was appointed Italtel Chief Operating Officer to reorganize and reposition the company, of which she became CEO in 2002. From September 2003 to January 2006, she was CEO of Siemens Informatica, the Siemens Business Services parent company in Italy. She became Member of the Executive Council of Siemens Business Services at worldwide level. In February 2006 she became Partner of Value Partners and CEO of the Value Team Group, which provides IT consultancy and services in Italy and abroad with approximately 2,700 professionals. In November 2008 she was appointed CEO of Olivetti and from June 2011 to March 2013 she also served as Chairman. Since March 2013, she has been Executive Chairman of Olivetti. She has been on the Board of Save the Children since December 2010. In June 2013 she was appointed member of the Board of Italgas S.p.A. She has also served as Member of the Board of Directors of Ferretti S.p.A., of the Milan Triennale and of the European Advisory Board of Guidant, a leading medical equipment manufacture.
    Born in 1952, Italian citizenship.
  • Léo Houle Director (Non-Executive Director - independent), Member of the Compensation Committee
    Mr. Houle was a Director of CNH Global N.V. from April 7, 2006 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial. On September 6, 2011, Mr. Houle was appointed to the Board of Directors of Chrysler Group LLC.
    Mr. Houle was Chief Talent Officer of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada, Canada’s largest communications company, from June 2001 until his retirement in July 2008. Prior to joining BCE and Bell Canada, Mr. Houle was Senior Vice-President, Corporate Human Resources of Algroup Ltd., a Swiss-based diversified industrial company. From 1966 to 1987, Mr. Houle held various managerial positions with the Bank of Montreal, the last of which was Senior Manager, Human Resources Administration Centers. In 1987, Mr. Houle joined the Lawson Mardon Group Limited and served as Group Vice-President, Human Resources until 1994 when Algroup Ltd. acquired Lawson Mardon Group at which time he was appointed Head of Human Resources for  the packaging division of Algroup and in 1997 Head of Corporate Human Resources of Algroup, Ltd. Mr. Houle completed his studies at the College Saint Jean in Edmonton, attended the Executive Development Program in Human Resources at the University of Western Ontario in 1987 and holds the designation of Certified Human Resources Professional (CHRP) from the Province of Ontario.
    Born 1947, Canadian citizenship.
  • Peter Kalantzis Director (Non-Executive Director - independent), Member of the Audit Committee, Member of the Compensation Committee
    Mr. Kalantzis was a Director of CNH Global N.V. from April 7, 2006 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial.
    Dr. Kalantzis has been a non-executive member of various boards of directors since 2001. Prior to 2000, he was responsible for Alusuisse-Lonza Group’s corporate development and actively involved in the de-merger and stock market launch of Lonza, as well as the merger process of Alusuisse and Alcan. Dr. Kalantzis served as head of the Chemicals Division of Alusuisse-Lonza Group from 1991 until 1996. In 1991 Dr. Kalantzis was appointed Executive Vice-President and Member of the Executive Committee of the Alusuisse-Lonza Group. Between 1971 and 1990 he held a variety of positions at Lonza Ltd. in Basel. Dr. Kalantzis is Chairman of the Board of Directors of Movenpick-Holding Ltd., Baar (Switzerland); Chairman of the Board of Clair Ltd., Cham (Switzerland); Chairman of Von Roll Holding Ltd., Breitenbach (Switzerland); Chairman of Lamda Development Ltd., Athens (Greece); Chairman of Elpe-Thraki S.A., Athens (Greece); Chairman of Zuricher Goldhandel AG, Cham (Switzerland) and Chairman of Degussa Sonne/Mond Goldhandel AG, Cham (Switzerland). He is a member of the Board of Paneuropean Oil and Industrial Holdings, Luxembourg; ofLamda Consolidated Holdings, Luxembourg; of Transbalkan Pipeline BV, Amsterdam; of SGS Ltd., Geneva (Switzerland); and of Hardstone Services SA, Geneva (Switzerland). From 1993 until 2002, he served on the Board of the Swiss Chemical and Pharmaceutical Association as Vice-President and in 2001-2002 as President. Dr. Kalantzis holds a Ph.D. in Economics and Political Sciences from the University of Basel and engaged in research as a member of the Institute for Applied Economics Research at the University of Basel between 1969 and 1971.
    Born in 1945, Swiss and Greek citizenship.
  • John Lanaway Director (Non-Executive Director - independent), Member of the Audit Committee
    Mr. Lanaway was a Director of CNH Global N.V. from April 7, 2006 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial. On September 6, 2011, Mr. Lanaway was appointed to the Board of Directors of Chrysler Group LLC.
    Mr. Lanaway was Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, North America, of McCann Erickson, one of the largest marketing communications networks in the world, from November 2007 until June 2011. From January 2001 to November 2007, he held similar positions at Ogilvy North America. Previously, he held the positions of Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President at Geac Computer Corporation Limited from 1999 to 2001; Chief Financial Officer of Algorithmics Incorporated from 1997 to 1999; and Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at Spar Aerospace from 1995 to 1996. Beginning in 1985 to 1995 Mr. Lanaway held various positions with Lawson Mardon Group Limited, including Sector Vice President, Labels North America from 1993 to 1995; Group Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from 1989 to 1992; General Manager, Lawson Mardon Graphics from 1988 to 1989; and Vice President, Financial Reporting and Control from 1985 to 1987. At Deloitte & Touche he served as Client Service Partner from 1980 to 1985 and as Student-Staff Accountant-Supervisor-Manager from 1971 to 1980. Mr. Lanaway graduated from  the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Ontario, C.A. and has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Toronto.
    Born in 1950, American, Canadian and British citizenship.
  • Guido Tabellini Director (Non-Executive Director - independent), Member of the Audit Committee
    Guido Tabellini was a Director of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. from March 10, 2011 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial.
    Guido Tabellini is a professor at Università Bocconi, where he also served as Rector from November 2008 to October 2012. Also at Bocconi, he served as Director and then President of the Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research (IGIER). Prior to that, Mr. Tabellini was an assistant professor of economics at Stanford University, UCLA, Università di Cagliari and Università di Brescia. He has been a research fellow and advisor for numerous international organizations and research institutes and was a member of the Council of Economic Advisors to the Italian Prime Minister and the Privatization Committee and Advisory Panel on Public Expenditures to Italian Ministry of the Economy. Mr. Tabellini was born in January 1956 and received a Ph.D. in Economics from UCLA in 1984. He is a member of several international research institutes, including CES- IFO (Munich), CEPR (London) and CIFAR (Toronto). He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has won the Y. Jahnsson Award from the European Economic Association and is also a former President of the European Economic Association. Mr. Tabellini has published numerous articles and books on macro-economics and political, international and public economics. He is also columnist for Il Sole 24 Ore. Board memberships at other listed companies: CIR.
    Born in 1956, Italian citizenship.
  • Jacqueline  Tammenoms  Bakker  Director  (Non-Executive  Director  -  independent),  Member  of  the Governance and Sustainability Committee
    Jacqueline A. Tammenoms Bakker was a Director of Fiat Industrial S.p.A. from April 5, 2012 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial.
    Jacqueline Tammenoms Bakker (1953) studied at Oxford University (BA) and the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies in Washington D.C. (MA). She joined Shell International in 1977 holding a number of positions in the Netherlands, the U.K. and Turkey. In 1989 she joined McKinsey where she worked as a consultant in the U.K. and the Netherlands until 1995 when she was appointed Vice-President Food Europe at Quest International (Unilever) in the Netherlands. In 1999 she moved to the public sector in the Netherlands, firstly as Director of GigaPort (a public-private initiative to roll out broadband networks), and then as Director-General of Freight Transport (2001-2004) and Director-General of Civil Aviation and Freight Transport (2004-2007) at the Dutch Ministry of Transport. In 2006 she was awarded the Légion d’Honneur for her contribution to cooperation between the Netherlands and France, and in 2006/2007 she chaired the High Level Group on the regulatory framework for civil aviation reporting to the EU Commissioner for Transport. Since 2008 Ms. Tammenoms Bakker has been an independent board member and is currently a member of the boards of Tesco PLC (UK) and Vivendi (France). She is Chairman of the Van Leer Group Foundation (NL) and Vice-Chair of the advisory board of the Rotterdam School of Management.
    Born in 1953, Dutch citizenship.
  • Jacques Theurillat Director (Non-Executive Director - independent), Chairman of the Audit Committee
    Born on March 20, 1959, Mr. Theurillat was a Director of CNH from April 7, 2006 until the integration of the company into CNH Industrial. Since May, 2008, Mr. Theurillat has served as Partner of Ares Life Sciences, a private equity fund whose objective is to build a portfolio in life sciences. Mr. Theurillat served as the Serono SA Deputy CEO until December 2006. In addition to his role as Deputy CEO, he was appointed Senior Executive Vice President, Strategic Corporate Development in May 2006 and was responsible for developing the company’s global strategy and pursuing Serono’s acquisition and in-licensing initiatives. From 2002 to 2006, Mr. Theurillat served as Serono’s President of European and International Sales & Marketing. In this position he was responsible for Serono’s commercial operations in Europe, IBO, Asia-Pacific, Oceania/Japan, Latin America and Canada. He became a Board member in May 2000. From 1996 to 2002, he was Chief Financial Officer. He previously served as Managing Director of the Istituto Farmacologico Serono in Rome, where he started in 1994. In 1993, he was appointed Vice President Taxes and Financial Planning for Serono. In 1990-1993, Mr. Theurillat worked outside Serono, running his own law and tax firm. Before that, he was Serono’s Corporate Tax Director, a post to which he was appointed in 1988. He first joined Serono in 1987 as a Corporate Lawyer working on projects such as the company’s initial public offering. Mr. Theurillat is a Swiss barrister and holds Bachelor of Law degrees from both Madrid University and Geneva University. He also holds a Swiss Federal Diploma (Tax Expert) and has a Master’s degree in Finance.
    Born in 1959, Swiss citizenship.
   

BOARD REGULATIONS

On September 9, 2013 the Board of Directors adopted, with effect from the date of closing of the mergers, its regulations. Such regulations deal with matters that concern the Board of Directors and its Committees internally.

The regulations contain provisions concerning the manner in which meetings of the Board of Directors are called and held, including the decision-making process. The regulations provide that meetings may be held by telephone conference or video-conference, provided that all participating Directors can follow the proceedings and participate in real time discussion of the items on the agenda.

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The Board of Directors can only adopt valid resolutions when the majority of the Directors in office shall be present at the Board meeting or be represented thereat.

A member of the Board of Directors may only be represented by a co-member of the Board of Directors authorized in writing.

The expression in writing shall include any message transmitted by current means of communication. A member of the Board of Directors may not act as proxy for more than one co-member.

All resolutions shall be adopted by the favorable vote of the majority of the Directors present or represented at the meeting, provided that the regulations may contain specific provisions in this respect. Each Director shall have one vote.

The Board of Directors shall be authorized to adopt resolutions without convening a meeting if all Directors shall have expressed their opinions in writing, unless one or more Directors shall object to a resolution being adopted in this way.

The regulations are available on the Company’s website, www.cnhindustrial.com.

   

THE AUDIT COMMITTEE

The Audit Committee is responsible for assisting the Board of Directors’ oversight of: (i) the integrity of the Company’s financial statements, (ii) the Company’s policy on tax planning, (iii) the Company’s financing, (iv) the Company’s applications of information and communication technology, (v) the systems of internal controls that management and the Board of Directors have established, (vi) the Company’s compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, (vii) the Company’s compliance with recommendations and observations of internal and external auditors, (viii) the Company’s policies and procedures for addressing certain actual or perceived conflicts of interest, (ix) the independent auditors’ qualifications, independence, remuneration and any non-audit services for the Company, (x) the performance of the Company’s internal audit function and of the independent auditors, (xi) risk management guidelines and policies, and (xii) the implementation and effectiveness of the company’s ethics and compliance program.

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The Audit Committee currently consists of Messrs. Theurillat (Chairman), Kalantzis, Lanaway and Tabellini. The Audit Committee is elected by the Board of Directors and is comprised of at least three members who may be appointed for terms of up to two years, each of whom must be a non-executive Director. Audit Committee members are also required (i) not to have any material relationship with the Company or to serve as auditors or accountants for the Company, (ii) to be “independent”, for purposes of NYSE rules, Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act and the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, and (iii) to be “financially literate” and have “accounting or selected financial  management expertise” (as determined by the Board of Directors). At least one member of the Audit Committee shall be a “financial expert” as defined in the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the rules of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and best practice provision III.5.7 of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. No Audit Committee member may serve on more than four audit committees for other public companies, absent a waiver from the Board of Directors, which must be disclosed in the annual report on Form 20-F. Unless decided otherwise by the Audit Committee, the independent auditors of the Company, as well as the Chief Financial Officer attend its meetings.

During the fourth quarter of 2013 the Audit Committee met twice and attendance of Directors at those meetings was 88%.

        

THE COMPENSATION COMMITTEE

The Compensation Committee is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Board of Directors in: (i) determining executive compensation consistent with the Company’s remuneration policy, (ii) reviewing and recommending for approval the compensation of executive Directors, (iii) administering equity incentive plans and deferred compensation benefit plans, and (iv) discussing with management the Company’s policies and practices related to compensation and issuing recommendations thereon.

The Compensation Committee currently consists of Mr. Elkann (Chairman), Ms. Grieco and Messrs. Houle and Kalantzis. The Compensation Committee is elected by the Board of Directors and is comprised of at least three directors. No more than one member may be non-independent under the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. The members of the Compensation Committee are appointed for terms of up to two years. Unless decided otherwise by the Compensation Committee, the Chief Human Resources Officer for the Company attends its meetings.

During the fourth quarter of 2013 the Compensation Committee met once with 100% attendance of Directors at such meeting.

THE GOVERNANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE

The Governance and Sustainability Committee is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Board of Directors with: (i) the identification of the criteria, professional and personal qualifications for candidates to serve as Directors of the Company, (ii) periodical assessment of the size and composition of the Board of Directors, (iii) periodical assessment of the functioning of individual Board members and reporting on this to the Board of Directors, (iv) proposals for appointment of executive and non-executive Directors, (v) supervision of the selection criteria and appointment procedure for senior management, (vi) monitoring and evaluating reports on the Group’s sustainable development policies and practices, management standards, strategy, performance and governance globally, and (vii) reviewing, assessing and making recommendations as to strategic guidelines for sustainability-related issues, and reviewing the annual Sustainability Report.

The Governance and Sustainability Committee currently consists of Mr. Elkann (Chairman), Ms. Gerowin and Ms. Tammenoms Bakker. The Governance and Sustainability Committee is elected by the Board of Directors and is comprised of at least three Directors. No more than two members may be non-independent, and none of the members may be executive Directors. The members of the Governance and Sustainability Committee are appointed for terms of up to two years.

In addition, as described above, the charters of the Audit Committee, Compensation Committee and Governance and Sustainability Committee set forth independence requirements for their members for purposes of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. Audit Committee members are also required to qualify as independent for purposes of NYSE rules and Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act.

During the fourth quarter of 2013 the Governance and Sustainability Committee did not have any meetings.

AMOUNT AND COMPOSITION OF THE REMUNERATION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Details of the remuneration of the Board of Directors and its Committees are set forth under the Section Remuneration of Directors.

INDEMNIFICATION OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The Company shall indemnify any and all of its Directors, officers, former Directors, former officers and any person who may have served at its request as a Director or officer of another company in which it owns shares or of which it is a creditor, against any and all expenses actually and necessarily incurred by any of them in connection with the defense of any action, suit or proceeding in which they, or any of them, are made parties, or a party, by reason of being or having been Director or officer of the Company, or of such other company, except in relation to matters as to which any such person shall be adjudged in such action, suit or proceeding to be liable for negligence or misconduct in the performance of duty. Such indemnification shall not be deemed exclusive of any other rights to which those indemnified may be entitled otherwise.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST

A member of the Board of Directors shall not participate in discussions and decision making with respect to a matter in relation to which he or she has a direct or indirect personal interest that is in conflict with the interests of the Company and the business associated with the Company (‘Conflict of Interest’).

In addition, the Board of Directors as a whole may, on an ad hoc basis, resolve that there is such a strong appearance of a Conflict of Interest of an individual member of the Board of Directors in relation to a specific matter, that it is deemed in the best interest of a proper decision making process that such individual member of the Board of Directors be excused from participation in the decision making process with respect to such matter even though such member of the Board of Directors may not have an actual Conflict of Interest.

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At least annually, each Director shall assess in good faith whether (i) he or she is independent under (A) best practice provision III.2.2. of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, (B) the requirements of Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act, and (C) Section 303A of the NYSE Listed Company Manual; and (ii) he or she would have a Conflict of Interest in connection with any transactions between the Company and a significant Shareholder or related party of the Company, including affiliates of a significant Shareholder (such conflict, a “Related-Party Conflict”), it being understood that currently Exor S.p.A. would be considered a significant Shareholder.

The Directors shall inform the Board through the Chairman or the Secretary of the Board as to all material information regarding any circumstances or relationships that may impact their characterization as "independent," or impact the assessment of their interests, including by responding promptly to the annual D&O questionnaires circulated by or on behalf of the Chairman that are designed to elicit relevant information regarding business and other relationships.

Based on each Director’s assessment described above, the Board shall make a determination at least annually regarding such Director’s independence and such Director’s Related-Party Conflict. These annual determinations shall be conclusive absent a change in circumstances from those disclosed to the Board that necessitates a change in such determination.

                                   

LOYALTY VOTING STRUCTURE

In accordance with the Merger Agreement, CNH Industrial implemented a loyalty voting structure, pursuant to which the former Shareholders of each of Fiat Industrial and CNH Global were able to elect to receive one CNH Industrial special voting share with a nominal value of €0.01 per share for each CNH Industrial common share they were entitled to receive in the Merger, provided that they fulfilled the requirements described in the terms and conditions of the special voting shares. Such Shareholders had their CNH Industrial common shares registered in a separate register (the “Loyalty Register”) of CNH Industrial’s share register. Following this registration, a corresponding number of special voting shares were allocated to the above-mentioned Shareholders, and the additional voting rights could be exercised at the first CNH Industrial Shareholders’ meeting which followed the registration. By signing an election form, whose execution was necessary to elect to receive special voting shares, Shareholders also agreed to be bound by the terms and conditions thereof, including the transfer restrictions described below.

Following the completion of the Merger, new Shareholders of CNH Industrial may at any time elect to participate in the loyalty voting structure by requesting that CNH Industrial registers all or some of their CNH Industrial common shares in the Loyalty Register. If these CNH Industrial common shares have been registered in the Loyalty Register (and thus blocked from trading in the regular trading system) for an uninterrupted period of three years in the name of the same Shareholder, such shares become eligible to receive special voting shares (the “Qualifying Common Shares”) and the relevant Shareholder will be entitled to receive one special voting share for each such Qualifying Common Share. If at any time such CNH Industrial common shares are de-registered from the Loyalty Register for whatever reason, the relevant Shareholder shall lose its entitlement to hold a corresponding number of special voting shares.

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A holder of Qualifying Common Shares may at any time request the de-registration of some or all such shares from the Loyalty Register, which will allow such Shareholder to freely trade its CNH Industrial common shares. From the moment of such request, the holder of Qualifying Common Shares shall be considered to have waived her or his rights to cast any votes associated with such Qualifying Common Shares. Upon the de-registration from the Loyalty Register, the relevant shares will therefore cease to be Qualifying Common Shares. Any de-registration request would automatically trigger a mandatory transfer requirement pursuant to which the special voting shares will be acquired by CNH Industrial for no consideration (om niet) in accordance with the terms and conditions of the special voting shares.

CNH Industrial’s common shares are freely transferable. However, any transfer or disposal  of  CNH  Industrial’s common shares with which special voting shares are associated would trigger the de-registration of such common shares from the Loyalty Register and the transfer of all relevant special voting shares to CNH Industrial. Special voting shares are not admitted to listing and are transferable only in very limited circumstances. In particular, no Shareholder shall, directly or indirectly: (a) sell, dispose of or transfer any special voting share or otherwise grant any right or interest therein; or (b) create or permit to exist any pledge, lien, fixed or floating charge or other encumbrance over any special voting share or any interest in any special voting share.

The purpose of the loyalty voting structure is to grant long-term CNH Industrial Shareholders an extra voting right by means of granting a special voting share (Shareholders holding special voting shares are entitled to exercise one vote for each special voting share held and one vote for each CNH Industrial common share held), without entitling such Shareholders to any economic rights, other than those pertaining to the CNH Industrial common shares. However, under Dutch law, the special voting shares cannot be excluded from economic entitlements. As a result, in accordance with CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association, holders of special voting shares are entitled to a minimum dividend, which is allocated to a separate special dividend reserve (the “Special Dividend Reserve”). The distribution of dividends from the Special Dividend Reserve can only be approved by the general meeting of the holders of special voting shares upon proposal of the Board of Directors of CNH Industrial. The power to vote upon the distribution from the Special Dividend Reserve is the only power that is granted to that meeting, which can only be convened by the Board of Directors of CNH Industrial as it deems necessary. The special voting shares do not have any other economic entitlement.

Section 10 of the terms and conditions of the special voting shares include liquidated damages provisions intended to discourage any attempt by holders to violate the terms thereof. These liquidated damages provisions may be enforced by CNH Industrial by means of a legal action brought by the Company in the courts of the Netherlands. In particular, a violation of the provisions of the above-mentioned terms and condition concerning the transfer of special voting shares may lead to the imposition of liquidated damages.

Pursuant to Section 12 of the terms and conditions of the special voting shares, any amendment to the terms and conditions (other than merely technical, non-material amendments) may only be made with the approval of the general meeting of Shareholders of CNH Industrial.

A Shareholder must promptly notify CNH Industrial upon the occurrence of a change of control, which is defined in Article 4(1)(n) of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association as including any direct or indirect transfer, carried out through one or a series of related transactions, by a CNH Industrial Shareholder that is not an individual (natuurlijk persoon) of

(i)the ownership or control of 50% or more of the voting rights of such Shareholder, (ii) the de facto ability to direct the casting of 50% or more of the votes which may be expressed at the general meetings of such Shareholder, or (iii) the ability to appoint or remove half or more of the Directors, executive Directors or Board members or executive officers of such Shareholder or to direct the casting of 50% or more of the voting rights at meetings of the Board, governing body or executive committee of such Shareholder. In accordance with Article 4(1)(n) of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association, no change of control shall be deemed to have occurred if (i) the transfer of ownership and/or control is the result of the succession or the liquidation of assets between spouses or the inheritance, inter vivos donation or other transfer to a spouse or a relative up to and including the fourth degree or (ii) the fair market value of the Qualifying Common Shares held by the relevant CNH Industrial’s Shareholder represents less than 20% of the total assets of the Transferred Group at the time of the transfer and the Qualifying Common Shares, in the sole judgment of CNH Industrial, are not otherwise material to the Transferred Group or the change of control transaction. Article 4(1)(n) of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association defines “Transferred Group” as comprising the relevant Shareholder together with its affiliates, if any, over which control was transferred as part of the same change of control transaction, as such term is defined in Article 4(1)(n) of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association. A change of control will trigger the de- registration of the relevant Qualifying Common Shares from the Loyalty Register and the suspension of the special voting rights attached to the Qualifying Common Shares.

If CNH Industrial were to be dissolved and liquidated, after all the debts of the Company have been paid, any remaining balances would be distributed in the following order of priority: (i) first, to satisfy the aggregate balance of share premium reserves and other reserves to the holders of CNH Industrial common shares in proportion to the number of common shares held by each of them; (ii) second, an amount equal to the aggregate amount of the nominal value of the CNH Industrial common shares to the holders thereof in proportion to the number of common shares held by each of them; (iii) third, an amount equal to the aggregate amount of the Special Dividend Reserve to the holders of special voting shares in proportion to the number of special voting shares held by each of them; and (iv) fourth, the aggregate amount of the nominal value of the special voting shares to the holders thereof in proportion to the number of special voting shares held by each of them.

GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS

At least one general meeting of Shareholders shall be held every year, which meeting shall be held within six months after the close of the financial year.

Furthermore, general meetings of Shareholders shall be held in the case referred to in Article 2:108a of the Dutch Civil Code and as often as the Board of Directors, the Chairman, the Senior Non-Executive Director or the Chief Executive Officer deems it necessary to hold them, without prejudice to what has been provided in the next paragraph hereof.

Shareholders solely or jointly representing at least ten percent (10%) of the issued share capital may request the Board of Directors, in writing, to call a general meeting of Shareholders, stating the matters to be dealt with.

If the Board of Directors fails to call a meeting, then such Shareholders may, on their application, be authorized by the interim provisions  judge  of  the court (voorzieningenrechter van de rechtbank) to convene a general meeting of Shareholders. The interim provisions judge (voorzieningenrechter van de rechtbank) shall reject the application if he is not satisfied that the applicants have previously requested the Board of Directors in writing, stating the exact subjects to be discussed, to convene a general meeting of Shareholders.

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General meetings of Shareholders shall be held in Amsterdam or Haarlemmermeer (Schiphol Airport), and shall be called by the Board of Directors, the Chairman, the Senior Non-Executive Director or the Chief Executive Officer, in such manner as is required to comply with the law and the applicable stock exchange regulations, not later than on the forty-second day prior to the meeting.

All convocations of meetings of Shareholders and all announcements, notifications and communications to Shareholders shall be made by means of an announcement on the Company’s corporate website and such announcement shall remain accessible until the relevant general meeting of Shareholders. Any communication to be addressed to the general meeting of Shareholders by virtue of law or the Company’s Articles of Association, may be either included in the notice, referred to in the preceding sentence or, to the extent provided for in such notice, on the Company’s corporate website and/or in a document made available for inspection at the office of the Company and such other place(s) as the Board of Directors shall determine.

Convocations of meetings of Shareholders may be sent to Shareholders through the use of an electronic means of communication to the address provided by such Shareholders to the Company for this purpose.

The notice shall state the place, date and hour of the meeting and the agenda of the meeting as well as the other data required by law.

An item proposed in writing by such number of Shareholders who, by law, are entitled to make such proposal, shall be included in the notice or shall be announced in a manner similar to the announcement of the notice, provided that the Company has received the relevant request, including the reasons for putting the relevant item on the agenda, no later than the sixtieth day before the day of the meeting.

The agenda of the annual general meeting shall contain, inter alia, the following items:

a)adoption of the annual accounts
b)granting of discharge to the members of the Board of Directors in respect of the performance of their duties in the relevant financial year;
c)the policy of the Company on additions to reserves and on dividends, if any;
dif applicable, the proposal to pay a dividend;
e)if applicable, discussion of any substantial change in the corporate governance structure of the Company; and
f)any matters decided upon by the person(s) convening the meeting and any matters placed on the agenda with due observance of applicable Dutch laws.

The Board of Directors shall provide the general meeting of Shareholders with all requested information, unless this would be contrary to an overriding interest of the Company. If the Board of Directors invokes an overriding interest, it must give reasons.

When convening a general meeting of Shareholders, the Board of Directors shall determine that, for the purpose of Article 18 and Article 19 of the Articles of Association of the Company, persons with the right to vote or attend meetings shall be considered those persons who have these rights at the twenty-eighth day prior to the day of the meeting (the Record Date) and are registered as such in a register to be designated by the Board of Directors for such purpose, irrespective whether they will have these rights at the date of the meeting. In addition to the Record Date, the notice of the meeting shall further state the manner in which Shareholders and other parties with meeting rights may have themselves registered and the manner in which those rights can be exercised.

The general meeting of Shareholders shall be presided over by the Senior Non-Executive Director or, in his absence, by the person chosen by the Board of Directors to act as chairman for such meeting.

One of the persons present designated for that purpose by the chairman of the meeting shall act as secretary and take minutes of the business transacted. The minutes shall be confirmed by the chairman of the meeting and the secretary and signed by them in witness thereof.

The minutes of the general meeting of Shareholders shall be made available, on request, to the Shareholders no later than three months after the end of the meeting, after which the Shareholders shall have the opportunity to react to the minutes in the following three months. The minutes shall then be adopted in the manner as described in the preceding paragraph.

If an official notarial record is made of the business transacted at the meeting then minutes need not be drawn up and it shall suffice that the official notarial record be signed by the notary. Each Director shall at all times have power to give instructions for having an official notarial record made at the Company's expense.

As a prerequisite to attending the meeting and, to the extent applicable, exercising voting rights, the Shareholders entitled to attend the meeting shall be obliged to inform the Board of Directors in writing within the time frame mentioned in the convening notice. At the latest this notice must be received by the Board of Directors on the day mentioned in the convening notice.

Shareholders and those permitted by law to attend the meetings may cause themselves to be represented at any meeting by a proxy duly authorized in writing, provided they shall notify the Company in writing of their wish to be represented at such time and place as shall be stated in the notice of the meetings. For the avoidance of doubt, such attorney is also authorized in writing if the proxy is documented electronically. The Board of Directors may determine further rules concerning the deposit of the powers of attorney; these shall be mentioned in the notice of the meeting.

The Company is exempt from the proxy rules under the U.S. Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

The chairman of the meeting shall decide on the admittance to the meeting of persons other than those who are entitled to attend.

For each general meeting of Shareholders, the Board of Directors may decide that Shareholders shall be entitled to attend, address and exercise voting rights at such meeting through the use of electronic means of communication, provided that Shareholders who participate in the meeting are capable of being identified through the electronic means of communication and have direct cognizance of the discussions at the meeting and the exercising of voting rights (if applicable). The Board of Directors may set requirements for the use of electronic means of communication and state these in the convening notice. Furthermore, the Board of Directors may for each meeting of Shareholders decide that votes cast by the use of electronic means of communication prior to the meeting and received by the Board of Directors shall be considered to be votes cast at the meeting. Such votes may not be cast prior to the Record Date. Whether the provision of the foregoing sentence applies and the procedure for exercising the rights referred to in that sentence shall be stated in the notice.

Prior to being allowed admittance to a meeting, a Shareholder or its attorney shall sign an attendance list, while stating his name and, to the extent applicable, the number of votes to which he is entitled. Each Shareholder attending a meeting by the use of electronic means of communication and identified in accordance with the above shall be registered on the attendance list by the Board of Directors. In the event that it concerns an attorney of a Shareholder, the name(s) of the person(s) on whose behalf the attorney is acting, shall also be stated. The chairman of the meeting may decide that the attendance list must also be signed by other persons present at the meeting.

The chairman of the meeting may determine the time for which Shareholders and others who are permitted to attend the general meeting of Shareholders may speak if he considers this desirable with a view to the orderly conduct of the meeting.

Every share (whether common or special voting) shall confer the right to cast one vote.

Shares in respect of which the law determines that no votes may be cast shall be disregarded for the purposes of determining the proportion of Shareholders voting, present or represented or the proportion of the share capital provided or represented.

All resolutions shall be passed with an absolute majority of the votes validly cast unless otherwise specified herein. Blank votes shall not be counted as votes cast.

All votes shall be cast in writing or electronically. The chairman of the meeting may, however, determine that voting by raising hands or in another manner shall be permitted.

Voting by acclamation shall be permitted if none of the Shareholders present objects.

No voting rights shall be exercised in the general meeting of Shareholders for shares owned by the Company or by a subsidiary of the Company. Usufructuaries of shares owned by the Company and its subsidiaries shall however not be excluded from exercising their voting rights, if the usufruct was created before the shares were owned by the Company or a subsidiary.

Without prejudice to the other provisions of the Articles of Association of the Company, the Company shall determine for each resolution passed:

a.the number of shares on which valid votes have been cast;
b.the percentage that the number of shares as referred to under a. represents in the issued share capital;
c.the aggregate number of votes validly cast; and
d. the aggregate number of votes cast in favor of and against a resolution, as well as the number of abstentions.

                                                                                       

ISSUANCE OF SHARES

The general meeting of Shareholders or alternatively the Board of Directors, if it has been designated to do so by the general meeting of Shareholders, shall have authority to resolve on any issuance of shares. The general meeting of Shareholders shall, for as long as any such designation of the Board of Directors for this purpose is in force, no longer have authority to decide on the issuance of shares.

The general meeting of Shareholders or the Board of Directors if so designated as provided in Article 5, paragraph 1 of the Articles of Association, shall decide on the price and the further terms and conditions of issuance, with due observance of what has been provided in relation thereto in the law and in the Articles of Association.

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If the Board of Directors is designated to have authority to decide on the issuance of shares, such designation shall specify the class of shares and the maximum number of shares that can be issued under such designation. When making such designation the duration thereof, which shall not be for more than five years, shall be resolved upon at the same time. The designation may be extended from time to time for periods not exceeding five years. The designation may not be withdrawn unless otherwise provided in the resolution in which the designation is made.

Payment for shares shall be made in cash unless another form of consideration has been agreed. Payment in a currency other than euro may only be made with the consent of the Company.

For a period of five years as of September 28, 2013, the Board of Directors has been irrevocably authorized to issue special voting shares up to the maximum aggregate amount of special voting shares as provided for in the Company’s authorized share capital as set out in Article 3, paragraph 1 of the Company’s Articles of Association.

For a period of five years as of September 29, 2013 (CNH Global N.V. merger effective date), the Board of Directors has been authorized by the Shareholders to execute any issuance of common shares in the capital of the Company, which authorization is limited to the issuance of 15% of the total number of common shares issued in the capital of the Company following the CNH Global N.V. merger effective date plus an additional 15% of the issued share capital of the Company as per the same date in relation to mergers or acquisitions. Furthermore and without application of the 15% limitation, the Board of Directors shall be authorized to issue common shares and grant rights to subscribe for common shares in the capital of the Company pursuant to the equity incentive plans sponsored by the predecessors CNH Global N.V. and Fiat Industrial S.p.A., (together with certain amendments due to their mutual alignment) and any future approved equity incentive or compensation plans.

The Board of Directors of the Company has been also designated as the authorized body to limit or exclude the rights of pre-emption of Shareholders in connection with the proposed authority of the Board to issue common shares and grant rights to subscribe for common shares as referred to above.

In the event of an issuance of common shares every holder of common shares shall have a right of pre-emption with regard to the shares to be issued of that class in proportion to the aggregate amount of his shares of that class, provided however that no such right of pre-emption shall exist in respect of shares to be issued to Directors or employees of the Company or of a group company pursuant to any option plan of the Company.

A Shareholder shall have no right of pre-emption for shares that are issued against a non-cash contribution.

In the event of an issuance of special voting shares to Qualifying Shareholders, Shareholders shall not have any right of pre-emption.

The general meeting of Shareholders or the Board of Directors, as the case may be, shall decide when passing the resolution to issue shares in which manner and, subject to paragraph 3 of Article 6 of the Articles of Association of the Company, within what period the right of pre-emption may be exercised.

     

CORPORATE OFFICES

The Company is incorporated under the laws of the Netherlands. It has its corporate seat in Amsterdam and the place of effective management of the Company is in the United Kingdom.

The business address of the Board of Directors and the senior managers is c/o CNH Industrial N.V., Cranes Farm Road, Basildon, Essex, SS143AD, United Kingdom.

The Company is registered at the Commercial Register kept at the Chamber of Commerce in Amsterdam under file number 56532474 and at the Companies House in the United Kingdom under file number FC031116 BR016181.

INTERNAL CONTROL SYSTEM

The Group has in place an internal control system (the “System”), based on the model provided by the COSO Report (Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission Report – Enterprise Risk Management model) and the principles of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, which consists of a set of policies, procedures and organizational structures aimed at identifying, measuring, managing and monitoring the principal risks to which CNH Industrial is exposed. The System is integrated within the organizational and corporate governance framework adopted by CNH Industrial and contributes to the protection of corporate assets, as well as to ensuring the efficiency and effectiveness of business processes, reliability of financial information and compliance with laws, regulations, the Articles of Association and internal procedures.

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The System, which has been developed on the basis of international best practices, consists of the following three levels of control:

  • Level 1: operating areas, which identify and assess risk and establish specific actions for management of such risk;
  • Level 2: central functions responsible for risk control, which define methodologies and instruments for managing risk and monitoring such risk;
  • Level 3: internal audit, which conducts independent evaluations of the System in its entirety.

Principal Characteristics of the Internal Control System and Internal Control over Financial Reporting

CNH Industrial has in place a system of risk management and internal control over financial reporting based on the model provided in the COSO Report, according to which the internal control system is defined as a set of rules, procedures and tools designed to provide reasonable assurance of the achievement of corporate objectives. In relation to the financial reporting process, reliability, accuracy, completeness and timeliness of the information contribute to the achievement of such corporate objectives. Risk management is an integral part of the internal control system. A periodic evaluation of the system of internal control over financial reporting is designed to ensure the overall effectiveness of the components of the COSO Framework (control environment, risk assessment, control activities, information and communication, and monitoring) in achieving those objectives.

CNH Industrial – which is listed on the NYSE and, consequently, will be subject to Section 404 of the United States Sarbanes-Oxley Act starting from 2014 – has a system of administrative and accounting procedures in place that seeks to ensure a highly reliable system of internal control over financial reporting.

The approach adopted by CNH Industrial for the evaluation, monitoring and continuous updating of the system of internal control over financial reporting, is based on a ‘top-down, risk-based’ process consistent with the COSO Framework. This enables focus on areas of higher risk and/or materiality, where there is risk of significant errors, including those attributable to fraud, in the elements of the financial statements and related documents. The key components of the process are:

  • identification and evaluation of the source and probability of significant errors in elements of financial reporting;
  • assessment of the adequacy of key controls in enabling ex-ante or ex-post identification of potential misstatements in elements of financial reporting; and
  • verification of the operating effectiveness of controls based on the assessment of the risk of misstatement in financial reporting, with testing focused on areas of higher risk.

Identification and evaluation of the risk of misstatements which could have material effects on financial reporting is carried out through a risk assessment process that uses a top-down approach to identify the organizational entities, processes and the related accounts, in addition to specific activities, which could potentially generate significant errors. Under the methodology adopted by CNH Industrial, risks and related controls are associated with the accounting and business processes upon which accounting information is based.

Significant risks identified through the assessment process require definition and evaluation of key controls that address those risks, thereby mitigating the possibility that financial reporting will contain any material misstatements.

In accordance with international best practices, the CNH Industrial Group has two principal types of control in place:

  • controls that operate at Group or subsidiary level, such as the delegation of authorities and responsibilities, separation of duties, and assignment of access rights for IT systems; and
  • controls that operate at process level, such as authorizations, reconciliations, verification of consistencies, etc. This category includes controls for operating processes, controls for closing processes  and  cross-sector controls carried out by service providers that are part of the Fiat Group. These controls can be preventive (i.e., designed to prevent errors or fraud that could result in misstatements in financial reporting) or detective (i.e., designed to reveal errors or fraud that have already occurred). They may also be defined as manual or automatic, such as application-based controls relating to the technical characteristics and configuration of IT systems supporting business activities.

An assessment of the design and operating effectiveness of key controls is carried out through tests performed by dedicated departments at subsidiary level and by the internal audit function, using sampling techniques based on international best practices. The internal audit function also conducts a qualitative review of the tests performed by subsidiary companies.

The assessment of the controls may require the definition of compensating controls and plans for remediation and improvement. The results of monitoring are subject to periodic review by the manager responsible for preparation of CNH Industrial’s financial reporting and communicated to senior management and to the Audit Committee (which in turn reports to the Board of Directors).

      

CODE OF CONDUCT

On September 28, 2013, the Board of Directors adopted a code of conduct (the “Code of Conduct”), which forms an integral part of the internal control system and sets out the principles of business ethics to which CNH Industrial adheres and which Directors, employees, consultants and partners are required to observe. In particular, the Code of Conduct includes specific guidelines on issues relating to the environment, health and safety, business ethics and anti- corruption, suppliers, management of human resources and the respect of human rights.

The CNH Industrial Group uses its best endeavors to ensure that suppliers, consultants and any third party with whom the CNH Industrial Group has a business relationship be informed of the adoption of the principles set forth in the Code of Conduct.

The Code of Conduct is available on the Governance section of the Group’s website,  www.cnhindustrial.com.

INSIDER TRADING POLICY

On September 9, 2013, the Board of Directors adopted an insider trading policy setting forth guidelines and recommendations to all Directors, officers and employees of the CNH Industrial Group with respect to transactions in CNH Industrial’s securities. This policy, which also applies to immediate family members and members of the households of persons covered by the policy, is designed to prevent insider trading or allegations of insider trading, and to protect CNH Industrial’s reputation for integrity and ethical conduct.

The Insider Trading Policy is available on the Governance section of the Group’s website,  www.cnhindustrial.com.

SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES

The CNH Industrial Group is committed to operating in an environmentally and socially-responsible manner.

As discussed above, the Governance and Sustainability Committee was assigned responsibility for strategic oversight of sustainability-related issues and reviews the annual Sustainability Report. The GEC defines the strategic approach, evaluates the congruity of the Sustainability Plan with business objectives and is regularly updated on the Group’s sustainability performance.

The Sustainability Unit, which is part of the Group’s financial organization, has operational responsibility for promoting a culture of sustainability throughout the Group, it facilitates the process of continuous improvement, and contributes to managing risks and strengthening the relationship with and perceptions of stakeholders, in addition to managing sustainability reporting and communications.

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The Group’s Code of  Conduct includes guidelines aimed at ensuring the Group’s activities are conducted in a consistent and responsible manner. In addition, the Group has also adopted “Sustainability Guidelines for Suppliers,” setting forth expectations for suppliers and sub-suppliers of the Group worldwide, “Environmental Guidelines,” which provide clear indications on how to establish and update environmental targets, develop new products and execute daily activities worldwide, and “Green Logistics Principles” setting forth principles for ensuring respect for the environment in the Group’s logistical and supply chain operations.

The Group also produces a Sustainability Plan, which reports on the progress of existing projects and new targets to drive continuous improvement in the Group’s sustainability performance. It is updated annually to report the status of existing projects and establish new targets to ensure continuous improvement to support long-term growth. The Sustainability Plan is incorporated in the Sustainability Report, which is prepared on a voluntary basis applying the Global Reporting Initiative’s G4 guidelines (GRI – G4).

The Group has placed particular emphasis on the reduction of polluting emissions, fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by means of:

  • powertrain technologies and associated components which are compliant with new emissions regulations, and their application on industrial, commercial and agricultural vehicles;
  • engine and transmission technologies and alternative fuels for commercial vehicles;
  • innovative architecture to deliver improvements in aerodynamics and reductions in vehicle weight; and
  • following the promotion of the use of alternative fuels and renewable energy sources and the managing of recovery, recycling and reuse rates.

In the Group’s manufacturing processes, priority continues to be placed on reducing the environmental impact and optimizing the energy performance.

CNH Industrial’s achievements in improving its sustainability performance have been recognized through inclusion in several leading sustainability indices. In particular, in September 2013, CNH Industrial was included in the Dow Jones Sustainability World and Europe Indices.

           

COMPLIANCE WITH DUTCH CORPORATE GOVERNANCE CODE

While CNH Industrial endorses the principles and best practice provisions of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, its current corporate governance structure deviates from the following best practice provisions:

  • CNH Industrial deviates from provision of paragraph III.2.1, which requires that all non-executive members of the Board of Directors, with the exception of not more than one, shall be independent, as two out of nine non- executive members of the Board of Directors may be qualified as non-independent Directors within the meaning of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code.
  • CNH Industrial deviates from provision of paragraphs III.3.3 and III.6.2, which require that a Board member may not take part in any discussion or decision-making that involves a subject or transaction in relation to which he or she may appear to have a conflict of interest with CNH Industrial, as the definition of conflict of interest set forth in the Board Regulations of CNH Industrial is geared towards an actual conflict of interest, as referred to in the Dutch Civil Code, and does not include the reference to the appearance of a conflict of interest. Nevertheless, the Board Regulations of CNH Industrial stipulate that the Board of Directors as a whole may, on an ad hoc basis, resolve that there is such a strong appearance of a conflict of interest of an individual Director in relation to a specific matter, that it is deemed in the best interest of proper decision making process that such individual Director be recused from participation in the decision making process with respect to such matter even though such Director may not have an actual conflict of interest.
  • CNH Industrial deviates from provision of paragraph III.5.1, which requires that the terms of reference of the various committees may provide that a maximum of one member of each committee may not be independent as the terms of reference of the Governance and Sustainability Committee state that a maximum of two members of that committee may not be independent and the initial composition of the Governance and Sustainability Committee is such that two out of the three members will not be independent.
  • CNH Industrial deviates from provision of paragraph III.5.11, which requires that the Compensation Committee may not be chaired by a member of the management Board of another listed company. The initial composition of the Compensation Committee is such that its chairman is also an executive Director of the Board of Directors of other listed companies.

IN CONTROL STATEMENT

Internal Control System

The Board of Directors is responsible for designing, implementing and maintaining internal controls, including proper accounting records and other management information suitable for running the business.

The principal characteristics of the Internal Control System and Internal Control over Financial Reporting adopted by CNH Industrial are described in the specific paragraph mentioned above.

Based on the assessment performed, the Board of Directors concluded that, as of December 31, 2013, the Group’s and the Company’s Internal Control over Financial Reporting is considered effective.

February 27, 2014

Sergio Marchionne
Chairman 

Richard J. Tobin
Chief Executive Officer 

Responsibilities in respect of the Annual Report

The Board of Directors is responsible for preparing the Annual Report, inclusive of the Consolidated and Statutory Financial Statements and Report on Operations, in accordance with Dutch law and International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board and as adopted by the European Union (IFRS).

In accordance with Section 5:25c, paragraph 2 of the Dutch Financial Supervision Act, the Board of Directors states that, to the best of its knowledge, the Financial Statements prepared in accordance with applicable accounting standards provide a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities, financial position and profit or loss for the year of CNH Industrial N.V. and its subsidiaries and that the Report on Operations provides a true and a fair view of the performance of the business during the financial year and the position at balance sheet date of CNH Industrial N.V. and its subsidiaries, together with a description of the principal risks and uncertainties that CNH Industrial N.V. and the Group face.

February 27, 2014

The Board of Directors

Sergio Marchionne

Richard J. Tobin

John Elkann

Mina Gerowin

Maria Patrizia Grieco

Léo W. Houle

Peter Kalantzis

John Lanaway

Guido Tabellini

Jacqueline A. Tammenoms Bakker

Jacques Theurillat